Vintage Bagpipe Archive

Photos and descriptions of all instruments featured
since October 2010

  • Henderson, circa 1930, cocuswood/Brazillian kingwood, nickel, ivory

    This is a slightly unusual Henderson set. It appears to be a mixture of cocuswood and Brazillian kingwood. This was not an uncommon Henderson configuration in the 1920s and 1930s. The ferrules are nickel, and the mounts and caps are ivory.

    This is a tonally superb set, with a sweetness to the Henderson sound that is different from the more robust blackwood.

    There are a couple of very slight dings in the projecting mounts, one on the blowstick, and a smaller one on the bass bottom.

    The set has no original chanter (the chanter in the photographs was included by mistake). All stocks are replicas with matching ferrules, as there were no stocks with this set. The blowstick stock is a poly split stock, the rest are blackwood.

    The pipes were refinished some years ago and the finish is still in excellent shape. The unusual wood configuration and replacement stocks result in a superb price for the classic Henderson sound.

    Email me about this set.

    As shown, sticks only
    CAD $3,650 plus shipping

    Set up to play – Ross Bag, ‘JMcG’ or MCC2 solo blacwood chanter, Kinnaird Evolution or Canning drone reeds, bag cover, cords.
    CAD $4,295 plus shipping

  • Robertson, hallmarked 1953 silver and ivory

    This is an absolutely lovely Robertson set made in Edinburgh in silver and ivory, hallmarked 1953. They are in beatiful shape with a gorgeous thistle silver pattern. The ivory is immaculate. The blowstick is a delrin replacement, though the ivory mount and thistle sleeve are original. The ivory bulb may or may not be original.

    The pipes come with the original Robertson chanter and silver sole. It’s not the kind of chanter one would play, as modern reeds don’t suit it, but it’s nice to have the original piece and the silver sole can be put onto another chanter.

    The set required only polishing on the lathe, shortening of the blowstick, and a gentle reaming of the tuning chambers to even up the tuning action again.

    The tone is as typically Robertson as the appearance — big, bold, and very steady.

    One thing to note is that the stocks are tapered, which Robertson did frequently before the mid-1950s. This means that if you employ a moisture control system with these pipes, it it will need to be a suction-cup type rather than a stock-insertion type as the latter will just fall out.

    The pipes also come with a “Certificate of Authenticity and Opinion of Value” done by Ron Bowen in 2016.

     

    Kris Test Continually myocardinate extensive technology before virtual “outside the box” thinking. Holisticly scale global interfaces before timely communities.

    Kris Test Continually myocardinate extensive technology before virtual “outside the box” thinking. Holisticly scale global interfaces before timely communities.